The Salient-Hidden Rulers


Institutional Ranking In Pakistan

Institutional Ranking In Pakistan


Only fools are glad when governments change. No, this isn’t my personal sentiment I’m expressing. It’s an old Romanian maxim that really-truly implies that it’s solely not the change of government that matters, but the change of system.


Since the time Iskander Mirza, the first president of Pakistan, imposed the Martial Law and appointed General Ayub Khan a Martial Law administrator, the history of Pakistan has always been at declasse. That was the first time army ever intervened in the politics of Pakistan. Things went by and Ayub Khan abdicated the serving General Yahya Khan. Those were the days when the commencement of ‘establishment’ started to happen. This is the same establishment we talk a lot about in regards with the mainstream politics of Pakistan. Since then, establishment — the army, intelligence and to some extent foreign powers — kept on deciding the fate of Pakistan. The influence of establishment in the politics of Pakistan grew more and more and year after year. And to date there have been 4 Martial Laws in Pakistan, to be precise the figure is 5. Besides, not to forget the role of our intelligence agencies — the imperative and decisive part of establishment — in the political culture of Pakistan.


There are quite a number of reasons and irrational motives why establishment has kept on interfering in the politics of Pakistan for last 5 decades. I had a debate with a friend on it few days back about it and we compared the similar situation in a view of fact that why there has been no martial law in India ever since independence or why establishment isn’t so predominant the way it’s in Pakistan. She gave the strong points and I agreed to that. Adapted to the words of her: Their (Indian) leadership and bureaucracy has always been hellishly strong; they never had impotent leaders like we had and still have. None of the leader and bureaucrat in India ever paved a way for martial law because they, from the beginning, stood strong ahead of the establishment i.e. army and intelligence and the opportunist political parties.


And what we always had for last 5 decades was Ayub Khan, the lodestar. We could have reset our political position and could have made strong the political institutions and ourselves, the awaam, by not endorsing the acts and moves of establishment after the first martial law which was also the first ever interference of army in politics and which was the beginning of the formation of establishment. Now today, establishment has become too strong, and interference in politics of Pakistan has become a requirements for survival of establishment itself that it’d take a long time to revert the things.


This is a fact that in Pakistan, it’s not the premier or president supervising the country nor their parliament is set upped to handle all democratic decisions; God-knows-what democracy we talk about in the contemporary world. If anything, it’s the establishment that decides the future of Pakistan in a major manner. Toppling the governments or using and abetting the political parties for their cause is something not very new coming from establishment. Of late, some top leadership of PML-N has been found covertly meeting with the top brass servicemen in GHQ. This all happened at a time while everyone knows president Zardari isn’t kindly-disposed when it comes to the establishment. Reasons are many to make president Zardari believe why establishment isn’t congenial with him while simultaneously the same establishment seems to be benignant with premier Gilani.


While all this is happening and establishment again is standing under the klieg light, we all must also understand the fact that removing Zardari wouldn’t be a settlement to start with a new era of peace and prosperity as removing Musharraf wasn’t a logical solution neither it gave a reasonable outcome since Zardari is also guided by the examples of Musharraf — nothing has changed so far; and because we know that the next-best in line (most certainly Nawaz Sharif) is another fallen angel as Zardari and Musharraf are. So why so much fuss about Zardari?


I feel like reiterating the Romanian maxim again: Only fools are glad when governments change. Eventually, it should be understood by everyone after the careful examination of this problem that we need to leash the establishment from ever intervening in the political culture of Pakistan. For that, I can only say all the ethnic, regional and national political parties of Pakistan shouldn’t fall prey to the uncalled for interference of establishment in politics. Let these institutions not to impede in the politics of Pakistan because, forsooth, they’re not meant for it. Turmoil only lasts as long as the status quo is unchanged. So we ought to find a way to make sure the status quo changes in our favor — in awaam’s favor, so that we really become the ones deciding the future of Pakistan, not the establishment nor the dictators.

Dishonest Pakistan



On 8th June 2009 I wrote: Democracy, Dictatorship, Communism, Socialism, Monarchy, Anarchy etc. – all are names of different Political and Economic systems. All can be good and at the same time all can not be good. The imperative system is ‘Justice’ what everyone needs.


In short, there’s nothing like “A good dictatorship” or “A poor democracy” or vice versa. What all citizens want is a good system – a good law and order – a good sovereignty of country where government is liable to protect the rights of its citizens which no one ever does.


When anyone talks about Musharraf and favors Musharraf, when anyone talks about MQM and favors MQM, when anyone talks about Nawaz Sharif and favors him, when anyone talks about Jeye Bhutto and favors PPP – it always make me feel sad that how knavishly we keep on ignoring the wickedness of the favored leaders. I personally know a host of Pakistanis who’re victim of our poor leaders including MQM, Musharraf, PML-N, PPP etc. When was the dignity of Musharraf when he sold a horde of Pakistanis to US for $20,000 each for rendition purpose? These people are now known as ‘Missing Person’.


I sent Eid Greetings to Amina Masood Janjua last time on Eid and her response was: No Eid without my husband; no Eid until we don’t recover all Missing Persons. I ask the Ghairat Brigade of Pakistan, where is the dignity of ours when our favorite leaders were selling our innocent Pakistanis for dollars and none of the ethnic and national political party raised its voice.


To me, one wrong deed overcomes thousand right deeds. This is how it’s.


MQM did right for the people of Karachi, PML-N worked a lot in Punjab – but we snub the fact the there are so many victims suffered and suffering from MQM, PPP, PML-N etc. political parties acts. I’m not against a person, but I feel that I should, however, raise the voice and bring up the problems against the often bad actions and transgressions by our political parties.


My Pakistan starts from the shores of Arabian sea and ends at Himalayan Range – and till that range I see, by and large, we’re dishonest to ourselves. People talking about Musharraf breaching the constitution, and the sayers breach the traffic laws too; people talking about corruption by PPP while a horde of the sayers from awaam are morally corrupted too; people talk about MQM’s extortion while myriads of plaintiffs often don’t leave a single chance to bully the people.


For many of us, by and large, Pakistan is limited to their city or province. They don’t care about what’s happening in the other parts of Pakistan. We often miss to address the dark side of our leaders and portray their bright side just to blot out their hypocrisies. It happens in the case of MQM too, it happens with Nawaz Sharif too, it happens in the case of Musharraf too, it happens with ruling PPP too.


A guy I know personally whose mom died during an air-strike in Bajaur. Who carried out the air-strike? Musharraf. I again ask the Ghairat Brigade: who’s responsible for it? We, ourselves, absolutely. We give our leaders the license to do whatever they want. MQM, PML-N, PPP – all can carry substantial rallies when it comes to their ‘seat’, no one would carry a single substantial rally against such atrocities.


This is a botched up political system of Pakistan, and unfortunately we preserve this political system while keeping the status quo maintain instead of raising our voice in rallies as ardently as we do in the case of BB’s barsii or Youm-e-Tasees and so on. Is it too much that I’m asking, or rather this nation is asking?


This country was never made on the name of Democracy. Even Liaquat Ali Khan was confused whether to adopt Democracy or Communism during his early days of governance. This country, if anything, was made on the name of “Justice”, that we’d give equal rights to everyone, we’d do justice with everyone, and that Army would never interfere in politics – Quaid-e-Azam said.


So far, I admire COAS Kayani to a commensurate extent that he’s wiser than Musharraf seeing as how he has no lust of power at least, and that today political leader have steered country to the dark, but he had never shown his thoughts and intents, even for a moment, to impose any Martial Law. During Long March, he had all this opportunity to impose the Martial Law, but he never did, even though the whole country was jolted so much during those days. Instead he met with political leadership and convinced them to show some mercy on the country and find a quick way to get out of this national turmoil.


People talk about ‘education’ every instance when the topic ‘Pakistan’ is under debate. Only ‘education’ isn’t a solution to solve all the problems. I believe in “Character Education” more than ‘education’ itself. Educated ones do breach the traffic rules, do violate constitution of Pakistan, do breach civil rules – but a person with “Character Education” wouldn’t do that.


We’re always up to market the manifesto of our affiliated political parties – but why don’t we market the simple and dignified version of Jinnah and Iqbal, I ask??


PS: I’ve portrayed the role of Government and Awaam in the progression and regression of Pakistan. I majorly impute Awaam for the current situation of Pakistan; however, this doesn’t mean we should never voice our protest against the government. We can, always!